Monthly Archives: June 2012

Week 5

The coy arrival of the first wave of summer squash

Hi, Folks!  Hope everyone’s enjoying cooling down a bit from last week.   I spent the weekend in Vermont with a friend for her bridal shower, while Wes labored away here in the fields.  I did make sure to check out the Montpelier farmers’ market, though, to investigate what farmers up there have to offer right now–all sorts of greens, some radishes here and there, and some beets.  Naturally, they have a cooler growing zone and are thus a little behind us in terms of production, but yet it is still astounding how far ahead we are in terms of what we are harvesting right now.  This week we have some typically summer delights that we are looking forward to giving out to you all.  This week’s share is quite large, due to a fine combo of factors accelerating some veggies’ ripening!  We hope the size isn’t intimidating to anyone.

This week’s share:

SIMPLE STEAMED SQUASH

      • Summer squash, sliced into 1/2 inch pieces
      • Small amount of water
      • Balsamic vinegar
      • Salt

Ninety percent of the time, we eat squash the simplest way possible next to eating it raw, which you can do if it is a smaller squash.  Just slice it up into 1/2 inch slices (cut again into half-moons if you like), and steam in a steamer basket or simply boil a small amount of water in the bottom of a pan–just about covering the bottom and a little more, but not enough to cover the squash–and toss in the squash for about a minute.  Scoop it out and drizzle with balsamic vinegar, then sprinkle with a little salt.  Add any other spices you like, such as red pepper flakes.

WINE-DRENCHED CABBAGE-SAUSAGE-ANISE DELIGHT (Or, The Meal That We Could Eat Every Single Day)

      • A Cabbage
      • A few links of sausage, preferably Italian spiced style (OPTIONAL – this tastes great with tempeh as well, or just with cabbage)
      • White or Apple Cider Vinegar
      • Red Wine
      • Anise/Fennel Seeds
      • Butter — a few pats, or however much you like
      • Salt

This is a meal in a pan, and takes about 15 minutes total.  My measurements are not highly precise, and they don’t really need to be, since it depends on your taste and how much liquid is needed to keep the skillet simmering.  Thinly slice the whole cabbage and set aside.  Slice up and brown the sausage in a large skillet–don’t cook it all the way, though.  Then throw in the cabbage and pour in about a quarter cup of the vinegar.  Let the cabbage soften, mixing every now and then, for about 5 minutes.  Now pour in about a half cup of wine, or however much suits your fancy.  Add a healthy sprinkle of anise seeds and a few pinches of salt.  Then add in a few pats of butter and mix all well.  Let simmer until the cabbage is nicely softened and the sausage fully cooked.   It’s fine to add water, too, if you need more liquid but don’t want more vinegar or wine.

SPICY BOK CHOY (AND KOMATSUNA) IN GARLIC SAUCE 

I am straight up stealing this recipe from allrecipes.com, because this is how we love to eat Asian greens, and it actually has precise measurements for you.  Original is here: http://allrecipes.com/recipe/spicy-bok-choy-in-garlic-sauce/

      • 1 pound bok choy
      • 1 tablespoon vegetable oil
      • 1 tablespoon sesame oil
      • 1/4 cup water
      • 1 teaspoon grated fresh ginger root
      • 2 cloves garlic, minced
      • 1 tablespoon oyster sauce
      • 1 tablespoon light soy sauce
      • 1 tablespoon brown sugar
      • 1/8 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes (optional)
 Directions
  1. Trim off the ends of the bok choy and chop, keeping the white parts separate from the green as they will need to cook longer. Rinse and spin or pat dry. Set aside.
  2. In a small bowl or cup, stir together the vegetable oil and sesame oil. In a separate larger bowl, stir together the water, ginger, garlic, oyster sauce, soy sauce, brown sugar and red pepper flakes. Set this aside.
  3. Heat the oil in a large skillet or wok over medium-high heat. Add the bok choy stems first; stir fry for a few minutes or until the pieces start to turn a pale green. When stems are almost cooked, add the leaves; cook and stir until leaves are wilted, 1 to 2 minutes. Remove from the heat and transfer the bok choy to a serving dish. Pour the sauce into the skillet or wok, and set over medium-high heat. Cook, stirring constantly, until sauce has thickened slightly, about 3 minutes. Pour over the bok choy and toss lightly to coat.

ALMOND-PARMESAN GREEN BEANS

      • 3/4 pound green beans
      • 2 Tblspoons olive oil
      • 2 cloves minced garlic
      • 1/4 cup slivered almonds
      • Parmesan cheese
      • Salt
      • Pepper

Cook green beans in a small amount of water until they are tender and crisp, about 5-10 minutes.  Drain.  In 2 Tblspoons olive oil saute the minced garlic and slivered almonds.  Add cooked beans and season with salt and pepper.  Sprinkle with Parmesan cheese.

CUCUMBER SALAD VARIATIONS

Salad 1:

      • Thinly sliced cucumbers
      • Thinly sliced onion (about 1/4 as much volume as the cukes)
      • 1/4 cup vinegar or lemon juice
      • 2 Tblspoons oil
      • 1/2 teaspoon salt
      • 1 Tblspoon sugar

Mix together and add to the cukes and onion

Salad 2:

      • Thinly sliced Cucumbers
      • Thinly sliced Onion
      • 3/4 cup plain yogurt
      • 1 Tblspoon fresh dill weed or mint

Place cucumbers and onion in a large bowl and sprinkle with 1 teaspoon salt.  Let sit for 1 hour.  Drain.  Then combine with the dill (or mint) and yogurt.  Very soothing.

That’s it for this week!  See you at distribution.

Bryn

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